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Brian Hoddy  |  Apr 08, 2021  |  0 comments
Brian Hoddy reveals some of his secrets to making a realistic scale instrument panel and cockpit components.

I think we can all agree that our hobby has undergone quite a revolution in the last few years. Compared to earlier models they are getting more and more refined in appearance and complexity.

Alex Whittaker  |  Mar 30, 2021  |  0 comments
Alex Whittaker celebrates Indoor F/F scale models and recommends them as possible winter projects

Some of the sweetest model aeroplanes I have ever seen in my life have been indoor free-flight scale models. There is something intensely appealing about their cute size, their accurate but tiny proportions and, most of all, their cleverly judged level of detail.

Danny Fenton  |  Mar 30, 2021  |  0 comments
In his February 2021 'Make It Scale' column Danny Fenton heads for the bright lights and seaside to compete in his first F4C competition.

It is interesting that the models shown in the very first column I wrote in 2012 are all currently seeing activity in one way or another, including my Apache PA-23-150 and my Black Horse Chipmunk. Even my Brian Taylor Mustang has seen progress. But you will have to wait for an update on those projects.

Pete Lowe  |  Feb 24, 2021  |  0 comments

Foam models have given rise to all sorts of questions, not least how best to stick them together and protect them. Pete Lowe finds a few solutions using the Deluxe Materials range.

Cliff Whittaker  |  Feb 17, 2021  |  0 comments
Why did the rules for model flying have to change? This thorny subject is discussed by Cliff Whittaker, who was an advisor to the BMFA during their negotiations with the CAA.
Alfred Vink  |  Feb 09, 2021  |  First Published: Dec 24, 2020  |  0 comments
Alfred Vink relates the story of Aviation Club Leiden's 2019 winter group build.

In November 2019 no one could have known what 2020 had in store for us. In fact, it was business as usual at my local club LLC (Aviation Club Leiden) here in The Netherlands. A club with great history, founded as early as 1936, and still going strong.

Shaun Garrity  |  Feb 08, 2021  |  First Published: Dec 24, 2020  |  0 comments

Shaun Garrity looks back to early R/C helicopters. This time in Retro Ramblings we have something a little different - retro helicopters. It’s hard to believe it was the early 1970s when I first came across them (I suddenly feel really old). R/C helicopters were actually flying prior to this but they were mostly constructed by pioneering modellers having to figure things out for themselves, because as far as I know no commercial products were available.

Lindsay Todd  |  Feb 08, 2021  |  First Published: Dec 24, 2020  |  0 comments
When I first started flying in the 1980s, with my father, most models of the time, at least in our club, were quite traditional. However, Leicester Model Centre (LMC) changed all that with the release of several fibreglass fuselage and foam wing 'jet' designs that were prop driven and became rather popular.
Andy Ellison  |  Dec 31, 2020  |  0 comments
If they're having fun then they'll want to go again. . . Have we given up trying to save the hobby for the next generation or do we have to adapt to change to ensure its continuation? Are our flying clubs destined to deteriorate into fields of grumpy old men depleting slowly and recounting tales of how it used to be? As the BMFA struggle on with their free flight founded education programme I was asked if there was anything we can do, individually or as a club in R/C land, to encourage new youngsters in, or help keep the ones we already have.
David Ashby  |  Nov 24, 2020  |  0 comments
24 days, 24 prizes! As the year end approaches (and especiallyafter the year we've all been having) what better time to have a little fun in the form of our popular Advent Prize Draw! Drop into the forum every day till the 24th December to grab a chancing of winning a prize. Thanks to our friends at J. Perkins Distribution, Sarik Hobbies and Overlander Batteries we've some fab things to hand out to 24 lucky winners. It all starts on 1st December, see you then! .
David Ashby  |  Sep 16, 2019  |  0 comments
We're grateful to Don Woodland who recently lent a copy of this, the first issue of The Amateur Aviator and Aero Model-Maker magazine from April 1912. Although model flying had been reported in some model engineering magazines in the past, the issue here may well be one of the first dedicated model flying publications in the UK. The Pioneer pictured here is Mr TWK Clarke of Kingston, described as one of the 'earliest successful model makers'. He has one of his all-wood heavy monoplanes and is noted as the inventor of the Clarke Flyer - of which many thousands had been sold before other model makers had made a machine that would fly at all.
David Ashby  |  Jul 16, 2019  |  0 comments
Let’s cast our minds back 43 years to that long, hot summer of 1976. On The Cover There was just one cover line that month, introducing David Boddington’s 40” (1016mm) wingspan Nieuport 24. David’s inspiration for this W. W.
Mike Freeman  |  Jan 02, 2019  |  0 comments
There’s no denying that Lithium Polymer (LiPo) batteries have revolutionised electric flight. Gone are the days when getting an electric model to fly above head height was considered an achievement. Electric flight is now a direct (some say better) alternative to i. c.
RCME Staff  |  Sep 27, 2018  |  0 comments
Believe it or not, the F-13 probably represents the high point of technical and commercial innovation in Hugo Junkers’ privately-owned Junkers Flugzeugwerke. Forget all the Ju-somethings of W. W. II, they came after both Hugo’s death in 1935 and the Nazis’ sequestration of the company.
RCME Staff  |  Jul 24, 2018  |  0 comments
Harvards still race at Reno every year. The famous prop roar is the sound of those supersonic tips. When it entered RAF service in July 1939, the US-built North American Harvard satisfied Britain’s desperate need for an advanced trainer that could bridge the widening gulf between the biplanes used for primary training and the new generation of fighters such as the Hurricane, which had already been operational for eighteen months. Yet, landmark though it may have been in Britain’s belated rearmament programme, the Harvard was only one member of a family of closely related aircraft that were produced over a period of 30 years, and which filled a variety of roles around the world, from trainer to fighter-bomber.

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