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David Ashby  |  Jan 18, 2008  |  0 comments
We're going to bring an end to the free replacement offer following publication of the undersized Typhoon plan in last years winter special issue. We'll no longer post out free plans from the end of January although readers will still receive a free plan when purchasing wood packs or mouldings. We've posted several thousand free plans to addresses all around the globe since the error was spotted and as replacement requests have now virtually stopped, we think the time is right. It goes without saying that it proved to be a costly mistake and although we don't regret the action we took to put things right, we hope our readers appreciate this decision.
Maurice Ashby  |  Dec 12, 2007  |  0 comments
If you're old enough to have been browsing the shelves of WH Smith back in May 1964, you might remember seeing RCM&E. The cover was an acid-yellow that month (how could you forget?) with a grainy black-and-white shot of Vic Smeed's Ohm 8 biplane trainer, a coverline inviting readers to build a relay-less servo from a kit, and a price of just six shillings (30p). QUAINT, BUT NOT CHEAP I say 'just', but back then, of course, the average wage was £1000, and the £3360 that those average wage-earners were paying for their houses makes you realise what an expensive hobby R/C modelling was: a single-channel radio set-up, for example, would have cost the princely sum of £16 10s 0d. Yes, for the equivalent of about £1500 in today's money, Radio Control Specialists of Hounslow would have been happy to supply you with a Tx - a box with only one button but featuring something called 'a silicon planar epitaxial output transistor'! - and an Rx that looked like a tobacco tin.
David Ashby  |  Nov 05, 2007  |  0 comments
The new look British Model Flying Association (BMFA) website is now live. To this observers eyes it looks fresher and seems to be easier to navigate although more important, it still provides a comprehensive list of clubs in the UK and should be a first port of call for anyone seeking somewhere to fly. Click here to visit the site. .
David Ashby  |  Oct 30, 2007  |  0 comments
US aircraft manufacturer Sonex has unveiled an electric powered, full size aircraft that has an uncanny resemblance to an R/C electric model. E-Flight's proof-of-concept prototype uses their flight proven Waiex airframe coupled with a purpose-built AeroConversions brushless DC cobalt motor, controller, and a highly efficient battery and charging system. Initial top speeds will reach approximately 130mph, and endurance is expected to range between 25 - 45 minutes or longer, depending upon power usage. The motor is the lightest, most powerful and efficient unit of its type ever produced.
David Ashby  |  Oct 25, 2007  |  0 comments
Well, we'd like to extend our sincere apologies to readers who have bought our Special Issue only to find that the plan is incorrect. I should quickly add that the error isn't the fault of designer Tony Nijhuis but occurred in-house when the design was transferred to our system. So what are we doing? Well, any readers who buy the wood packs and/or canopies and cowl will receive or have received a copy of the correct plan with their order. We have printed a coupon in the November issue of the magazine and readers who would like a copy of the plan need just send this in to us.
David Ashby  |  Oct 22, 2007  |  0 comments
Some explanation may be in order for those unfamiliar with a Podcast. Basically a free home made radio programme or indeed a downloadable professional show, Podcasts have become hugely popular over the last few years and now cover a gamut of subjects from knitting to, well, RC flying. Some RC Podcasts have come and gone over the last few years but this new show from the USA is standing the test of time. Initial episodes covered helicopters but the presenters, Chris, Jamie and Diggs have sensibly now expanded the subject matter to anything that flys.
David Ashby  |  Oct 17, 2007  |  0 comments
The above headline from the Sun newspaper on 27th September aroused our curiosity not least because the newspaper reported that the flyer in question had been hired on a £50,000 contract by the army. Tasked to take off and land UAVs, the unnamed 'champ' had been recruited after Royal Artillery troops had crashed a number of the £2m, 32ft span unmanned reconnaissance aircraft. The pilot has asked not to be named for security reasons but if you know a flyer who's suddenly acquired a suntan and a new motor, not to mention some shiny new models then he might well be our man! Thanks go to reader David Hope for drawing our attention to the story and the Sun Newspaper for their kind permission to reproduce their article. .
David Ashby  |  Oct 11, 2007  |  0 comments
Many of us buy and sell the odd model every now and again but I hope you don't mind me drawing your attention to a rather impressive model that's just come up for sale. LMA member and renown large jet flyer Gordon Nichols has decided to part company with V for Victor, his 17. 5ft span Victor B2 bomber. Powered by two JetCat P120 motors, the model weighs some 130lbs.
David Ashby  |  Oct 08, 2007  |  0 comments
Make a nice Christmas prezzie don't you think?
Tom Bailey  |  May 31, 2007  |  0 comments
The Venus 40 ARTF made it easy for fans of . 40-size models to enjoy the challenge of pattern aerobatics. Now, the Venus II ARTF offers pilots the chance to enjoy the same crisp performance and ARTF convenience with a . 60 - 1.
Tom Bailey  |  May 14, 2007  |  0 comments
Here’s a peek at the IL300, a special issue in-line four cylinder effort from engine giants O. S. It’s being utilised here by Australian Tom Watson in a fantastic Tiger Moth – click the image for a bigger view. We’ll have more on the IL300 with a full review from Brian Winch in this year’s RCM&E Special, which is due out in September.
Tom Bailey  |  Feb 08, 2007  |  0 comments
First off, yes, I know it's spelt 'mettle'; it was an attempt at a pun. You'll see why shortly, although that won't make it any funnier. Sorry. Spanish-based outfit Alumairplanes have launched the first of a unique series of model aeroplanes – yes, the clue's in the comapny title.
Editorial team  |  Dec 12, 2006  |  0 comments
Adevelopment of the Grumman F9 Panther, the F9F Cougar differed by nature of a swept wing, horizontal tailplane and improved performance. The Panther hadn't fared too well against the MiG-15 in the Korean war and the Cougar was developed to remmedy this situation, although it arrived too late to see action. With hostilities at an end, the Cougar went on to serve in reconnissance and target drone roles and was later adopted by the US Navy aerobatic team – The Blue Angels – as their first jet display aircraft. THE KIT Developed to a scale of 1:5 from original factory drawings, the kit is by Airworld in Germany.

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