Flying Techniques

Sort By: Post DateTitle Publish Date
RCME Staff  |  Aug 04, 2015  |  0 comments
1. Aerodynamic appreciation. You don’t have to become an aerodynamicist, but it helps if you can appreciate some of the basic principles of flight and how they affect your model’s performance. Do you know why aircraft stall? What about the difference between ground speed and air speed, and why differing wing sections work the way they do? Having a good general appreciation of what can affect an aeroplane’s flying characteristics is something that most aeromodellers develop over time, yet any extra you can do to enhance your aerodynamic awareness is all to the good.
David Ashby  |  Jul 04, 2015  |  0 comments
1. Know the Law. Regrettably in our increasingly litigious society, flying R/C model aircraft is not a free-for-all. Laws are in place which govern its practice.
RCME Staff  |  Dec 04, 2015  |  0 comments
1. Aerotowing is a rare synergy between silent and not so silent aircraft and requires that two skill-sets are combined in a team effort to safely deposit a glider at height. Each pilot must take responsibility for the safety of his own aircraft and in this respect the glider guider must ensure that the aerotow release and retracting wheel (if fitted) operates faultlessly. The release must be operated by a separate switched channel, the toggle positioned so that you can comfortably rest a forefinger in position throughout the tow phase.
RCME Staff  |  Jan 02, 2020  |  0 comments
1. Aerodynamic appreciation. You don’t have to become an aerodynamicist, but it helps if you can appreciate some of the basic principles of flight and how they affect your model’s performance. Do you know why aircraft stall? What about the difference between ground speed and air speed, and why differing wing sections work the way they do? Having a good general appreciation of what can affect an aeroplane’s flying characteristics is something that most aeromodellers develop over time, yet any extra you can do to enhance your aerodynamic awareness is all to the good.
RCME Staff  |  Sep 25, 2015  |  0 comments
1. Make an informed purchase. The vast choice of model helicopters that are available can seem overwhelming. Before you buy, think about where you will fly and for how long, what spares availability is like, your level of competence and what the reviews say.
Paul Bardoe  |  Feb 26, 2016  |  0 comments
So, you like fast models, do you? Perhaps you’re the speed freak in your club who constantly strives to have the fastest aeroplane? Can you fly smoothly and accurately? Do the pitfalls and failures of the hobby only inspire you to try harder? Is winning important to you? Does coming second feel like failure? Comfortable with a little noise? Hmm, if you’ve answered yes to all of these then it’s just possible that you’ve got what it takes to become a successful pylon pilot and compete with fellow like-minded modellers for the ultimate UK accolade, the RCM&E trophy and the title of British Pylon Race Champion. Want to know more, then here’s a few pointers to help you on your way: 1. Start with a visit to www. pylonracer.
RCME Staff  |  Dec 31, 2015  |  0 comments
1. Don’t overstep your mark. Every pilot knows his own ability and for a test flight to go well it’s important not to overstep this unless you’re absolutely sure that you can happily achieve the goal. It’s good to have a healthy level of caution, and perhaps a little apprehension, as this shows respect for the fact that test flying is not always straightforward.
Andy Ellison  |  Mar 05, 2015  |  0 comments
TEST FLIGHTS CAN JUST AS EASILY BE PROBLEM-FREE AS THEY CAN DAUNTING AND DISASTROUS. ANDY ELLISON PROVIDES 10 TOP TIPS TO HELP ACHIEVE THE FORMER 1 Don’t overstep your mark. Every pilot knows his own ability and for a test flight to go well it’s important not to overstep this unless you’re absolutely sure that you can happily achieve the goal. It’s good to have a healthy level of caution, and perhaps a little apprehension, as this shows respect for the fact that test flying is not always straightforward.
RCME Staff  |  Aug 07, 2019  |  0 comments
1. Big-bang bands. In the ‘good’ old days, band spattering 27 Megacycle transmitters and superegen receivers had to be used one at a time, owing to serious interference issues with two models airborne together. CB radio didn’t help much but, fortunately, these days we have two very reliable, legal frequencies in both 35MHz and 2.
Chris Williams SG  |  Jun 02, 2021  |  0 comments
Chris Williams and chums try their hand at a spot of electric powered glider tugging.

It all started a couple of years ago, when my long-time flying buddy, Barrington V. Smallpiece built a miniature scale glider - a Skylark from the West Wings kit.

RCME Staff  |  Apr 03, 2017  |  0 comments
Aviators have to return to earth sooner or later, and we aeromodellers are no exception. Gravity is ever-present, both as friend or foe, and, as far as aircraft are concerned, the rules regarding landing are the same for full-size as they are for models. In this article we’ll explore the two methods of landing, i. e.
RCME Staff  |  Aug 06, 2015  |  0 comments
Right then, here’s the scenario. You’re a beginner, you’ve had a good few flights now and you’re doing well. Circuits seem easy, and you’ve even accomplished a nervy take-off. Your instructor decides to let you try a landing, and why not? It’s a calm day, after all.
Andy Ellison  |  Sep 26, 2013  |  0 comments
Talk about flaps in R/C aeromodelling circles and there’ll no doubt be a fair amount of puzzlement and head scratching as to their true function and application. There’s no doubt that flaps are becoming more common in the modelling sphere with the pushing of ARTF boundaries to include scale warbirds, bombers and jets. Model turbines are shoving airframes ever faster, and moulded composite technology is making gliders ever slicker. Surely, then, flaps are much more than just an inconvenience that we need to buy extra servos for? BIG BOYS Full-size aircraft design has always been something of a compromise.
Graham Ashby  |  Jan 22, 2014  |  0 comments
Treat water like concrete and you'll not go far wrong. Although I’ve been model flying now for over twenty years, it’s only recently that I’ve realised my long-term ambition of flying off water. It’s a desire I’ve harboured ever since building my first trainer and one that probably stems from my earlier interest in model boats. Yes, it’s true, many years ago I was a hardened model boat enthusiast with an enviable collection of yachts, cruisers and powerboats.
RCME Staff  |  Oct 10, 2016  |  0 comments
The bungee is essentially a super-size catapult that comes into its own when a conventional hand-launch just can’t cut it, providing that extra ‘va-va-voom’ just when you need it most. Blindingly simple in looks and operation, careful preparation and a few basic ground rules can make all the difference between a flat-out failure and a picture-perfect take-off. Let’s see what it’s all about. FANTASTIC ELASTIC The most critical part of a bungee launcher is the elastic itself.

Pages

X
Login using Modelflying Login